Where to Learn To Do Your Work? - Pontiac GTO Forum
User Tag List

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-18-2019, 02:35 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Where to Learn To Do Your Work?

Hi I am new to the forum, and if I am breaking any rules, please direct me to the rules so I don't make the same mistake again. My aunt has a numbers matching 1967 GTO sitting in her garage that she said she would sell when I saved up enough money. This car doesn't have any rust, and is all original, but it hasn't been driven in probably at least 10 years and before that probably over 20 years. I would like to do as much of the work as I can myself, but I don't know much beyond how to change oil. What would be the best way to go about learning? I am a full time graduate student , but I considered taking some courses at my local community college over the summer. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
fracturedbutwhole is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-18-2019, 05:44 AM
 
PontiacJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Gastonia, NC - Born & raised in Connecticut - 31 years
Posts: 3,646
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 390 Post(s)
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by fracturedbutwhole View Post
Hi I am new to the forum, and if I am breaking any rules, please direct me to the rules so I don't make the same mistake again. My aunt has a numbers matching 1967 GTO sitting in her garage that she said she would sell when I saved up enough money. This car doesn't have any rust, and is all original, but it hasn't been driven in probably at least 10 years and before that probably over 20 years. I would like to do as much of the work as I can myself, but I don't know much beyond how to change oil. What would be the best way to go about learning? I am a full time graduate student , but I considered taking some courses at my local community college over the summer. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Mechanical courses at a community college would be a good start, but my guess is that they will focus more on the repair/maintenance of newer model cars and not the older model cars. Still, you can get some basics which will apply.

Purchase a Factory Service Manual for the car. These can be had reproduced in book form or CD. Many of the Pontiac parts suppliers offer them and Ebay. You probably won't jump into tearing down & rebuilding an engine, trans, or rear axle, but you can learn how to tune the engine, change brakes, rebuild a carb, general maintenance, etc. which is the smaller stuff typically done by the owner. You can learn to do more, but that comes in time if you choose to.

Join the GTO association or the Pontiac-Oakland International Club (POIC). POIC has available their past issues online as PDF, so you can gain some knowledge there. Join a local car club if you have one or check out any local cruise nights that will have guys who work on their cars - make friends who can help. Car shows - talk with owners. Youtube has a lot of helpful video's. Then there are many books on the market that can help understand and work on the mechanical & body parts of the car.

Much of the learning is through the experience of just doing it.
PontiacJim is offline  
post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-18-2019, 09:48 AM
64-67 Expert
 
geeteeohguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Fresno, California
Posts: 8,541
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
What Jim said. I have seen these cars come to life with very little work after sitting a similar (long) length of time. Particularly in the Bay Area. I am an Oakland native, and used to work in SF. You are at a huge advantage, because the car will have rust free brake lines, fuel lines, fuel tank, chassis, etc. (both my GTO's are the same way). You MAY need to replace the timing cover on the car, as over time, the aluminum can corrode and you'll get coolant in the oil and vise-versa. But you might not. My advice would be to change the oil, replace the brake rubber hoses and wheel cylinders and perhaps master cylinder, change the coolant, and run it. If it runs/shifts/drives ok, you can then service the trans and rear end oil. Do a basic engine tune up. These are simple, rugged, durable vehicles. Easy to keep running if not messed with. The biggest mistake I usually see is a guy getting a car, and tearing it all down to 'restore' it, and getting overwhelmed prior to giving up entirely, and either selling a pile of parts, or pushing it into the corner for a lifetime. Don't be that guy. Me? I became a tune-up mechanic at age 19 after working in an auto parts store and machine shop for a year. I apprenticed as a general mechanic at 20, got my Smog Inspector/Adjuster license, and by 21 became a journeyman auto mechanic in 1982. I became ASE certified in 1983, and worked in the industry repairing all makes of cars, until 1996. In '96, I began work with the government doing automotive repair related law enforcement, and I'm set to retire in 2 years. It's been a great career for me, as I've been a 'car guy' literally since birth.
Welcome to the forums and good luck. Take your time, ask questions, and we'll help all we can. Nothing wrong with another early GTO on the streets!!
Jeff
geeteeohguy is online now  
 
post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-18-2019, 12:08 PM
 
1968gto421's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Travelers Rest, South Carolina
Posts: 760
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
A club can be real helpful as many of the guys have lots of experience rebuilding and repairing cars. I found my local AACA back in the '80's and while there were money guys who had shops do all the work, there were many more who did it themselves. One was an engineer with a local building company who did award winning frame-offs in his own garage. He was very helpful to the guys and gals who were inexperienced and gave help and advice freely. So do not overlook that.

Antique Automobile Club of America (AACA) - Regions & Chapters | Community
1968gto421 is online now  
post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-19-2019, 12:48 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PontiacJim View Post
Mechanical courses at a community college would be a good start, but my guess is that they will focus more on the repair/maintenance of newer model cars and not the older model cars. Still, you can get some basics which will apply.

Purchase a Factory Service Manual for the car. These can be had reproduced in book form or CD. Many of the Pontiac parts suppliers offer them and Ebay. You probably won't jump into tearing down & rebuilding an engine, trans, or rear axle, but you can learn how to tune the engine, change brakes, rebuild a carb, general maintenance, etc. which is the smaller stuff typically done by the owner. You can learn to do more, but that comes in time if you choose to.

Join the GTO association or the Pontiac-Oakland International Club (POIC). POIC has available their past issues online as PDF, so you can gain some knowledge there. Join a local car club if you have one or check out any local cruise nights that will have guys who work on their cars - make friends who can help. Car shows - talk with owners. Youtube has a lot of helpful video's. Then there are many books on the market that can help understand and work on the mechanical & body parts of the car.

Much of the learning is through the experience of just doing it.
Thank you so much for your reply! I really appreciate your advice and your time. I want to do it the right way, and those sound like great places to start.
fracturedbutwhole is offline  
post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-30-2019, 11:43 AM
 
GhostTown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Idaho
Posts: 181
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I started my foray into the car hobby much like you. My project (my mother's 65 Lemans) sat for 24 years. I had a neighbor who had a lifetime of experience help me get it running, show me how the essentials worked, and I took off on my own with a shop manual and Google.

I've changed the water pump, fuel pump, clutch, and many electrical parts on my own since then. I've paid to have the carb rebuilt, tranny (3 speed manual) resealed, and for a little help with a new pinion seal.

I drive the car almost full time from spring to fall. At least 5 days a week. It's always easy to find someone to answer a question if I have one.

Once you have the car in your possession, the hard part imo, you'll have PLENTY of people who will want to help you get started. Spend time looking over the car with a manual in hand. Learn what and where things are. Ask what you might feel are elementary questions. You'll get it all on your own soon.
GhostTown is offline  
post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-30-2019, 01:49 PM
 
Instg8ter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Near Detroit
Posts: 3,931
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Read up, ask questions on here, set a game plan of small projects that will keep you on the road while your restoring, mechanical first make it safe and reliable FIRST.
All the while you will be thinking in yoru mind what you want it to lok like, and that may change depending on budget and time. If you are able to drive it, you will stay interested because its a damn rush!! You will find people circling your car when you come out of the store, talking to you at lights and more thumbs up than you can count even with a well worn sheen of use.

I am a carpenter, and have some jig and fixture building skills from past jobs, i felt comfortable doing mechanical stuff as like the guys have told you they are relatively simple machines when you break them down to smaller chunks. That said i started pricing body work and paint. My car was a high desert find that had sat in a car port since '76 and the body was all metal never taken apart less a few silver dollar patches, so i figured id get off light on price opposed to a car that needed a ton of patch and fill. As the bids start coming in from reputable paint shops i felt my heart sink, they wanted more than half my "starting" budget on the low end....OUCH! Plan B, start reading and talking with Bear as he was on the same stages as me through our restores. with information in hand i dive into smoothing the body after a pal welds in my metal. Over 200 hrs later i am smoothed primed and sealed in the garage and ready to put color on her. I was able to secure the use of a new booth and Iwata zero gravity gun for spraying by going through the local high school, cost $250.00 and was a right off as the money went to the car club
win/win.
So the answer is YES you can do most all by yourself with the right tools, time and desire and you can control your budget, i used all kinds of parts i found on e-bay and craigslist, also sales , my rule was 30% discount before i bought anything. total restoration took 10 months.

Heres a few pics of it done and the signature one is the day i picked it up. it has been through a carb fire and top side re-paint and a new motor since done and i put about a thousand miles a season on it.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	e5d9b908ad8756d5586c274053cd04af_790.jpg
Views:	19
Size:	4.0 KB
ID:	119315   Click image for larger version

Name:	fcaaea5187d905ff5bc3cefa24f786fa_789.jpg
Views:	19
Size:	5.3 KB
ID:	119317   Click image for larger version

Name:	84de0da6511f3a2da52262229116601a_792.jpg
Views:	18
Size:	4.0 KB
ID:	119319   Click image for larger version

Name:	5f1b3e217e7c490c43cd613e92ecd2c4_795.jpg
Views:	18
Size:	4.8 KB
ID:	119321   Click image for larger version

Name:	53fa74145b43b29a806231638b8a2729_791.jpg
Views:	18
Size:	2.3 KB
ID:	119323  

Click image for larger version

Name:	ae6b35f4c285e577a86b87ebac51378c_796.jpg
Views:	18
Size:	5.7 KB
ID:	119325   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1180.JPG
Views:	22
Size:	138.0 KB
ID:	119327   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1188.JPG
Views:	21
Size:	159.2 KB
ID:	119329   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1197.JPG
Views:	21
Size:	724.6 KB
ID:	119331  

Instg8ter is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  Pontiac GTO Forum > The 1964-1974 Pontiac Tempest, Lemans & GTO > 1964-1974 Tempest, Lemans & GTO General Discussion

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Pontiac GTO Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Another Mustang GT: They never learn tiger gto Racing and Kill Forum 83 01-02-2009 09:39 AM
Mustang Drivers never learn part II fergyflyer Racing and Kill Forum 14 10-17-2008 09:37 AM
Im here to learn! Mr.CleanMod9721 Member Introductions 4 11-11-2006 08:39 AM
And Peter Paul and Mary sing: "When will they EVER learn" UdnUdnGTO Racing and Kill Forum 0 06-30-2006 03:33 PM
[Freebies] How they work, why they work & how to work them. Last The Lounge 1 01-09-2005 07:15 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome