what makes 69 so impossible?! brake conversion - Impala Tech
Brakes & Suspension Conversion Questions & more

 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 02:31 PM Thread Starter
 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Green Bay
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what makes 69 so impossible?! brake conversion

So in the endeavor to restore my 1969 caprice I've come across numerous times where parts listed go up to 1968 then 1970 on out. Why nothing for 1969?! Is it really that different?! I've been trying to find the parts I need to convert to 4 corner disc brakes and am stumped. I will be getting wilwood upgraded calipers once I know what style the right conversion will accept and 11" powerslot rotors. Id LIKE a 2" drop spindle and have the order in for tubular upper and lower control arms with qa1 coilovers already. I'm not concerned about master cylinder or booster selection as of yet. And as for the rear, I have the factory 10 bolt at the moment but will be putting a 12 bolt under her once I find a suitable candidate.
So what will work with this car? And is 1969 compatible with other years generally even if the application selections differ? I guess that's more of a general question there.

Last edited by 03impala9c1; 05-13-2014 at 02:54 PM.
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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 02:53 PM Thread Starter
 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Green Bay
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Forgot to add that the car is being built for light auto cross if that matters

1969 Caprice 327 TH350 - restomod project
2003 Impala 9c1 - stuff done
1964 Chevelle Malibu SS - mild resto
1976 XJ12 - stock v12/bagged
1998 Trans Am - lots done
1999 GTP - lots done
1999 GSE - T66 T3/T04e hybrid
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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 03:41 PM
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1969 was the first year that all GM cars had the option for disc brakes using the new GM designed single piston caliper. But because GM was still concerned if it would work on big cars they made a special; two year only bigger version of the one piston caliper just for the 1969 and early 1970 year cars which because few ordered disc brakes is a very rare item to source used. Your 1969 will also accept the Girling four piston cast iron disc brake caliper that was offered in 1968 (it is basically the rear disc Corvette rotor bolted to a special one year only front wheel hub that used a Corvette caliper). All of the Corvette brake parts are reproduced except for the wheel hub. I have heard of members who have chucked up their drum brake hubs and turning them on a lathe to bolt up to the rear rotor off of a C2, C3 Corvette, but I have no idea what the dimensions are that they turned them to.

Big Dave
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 08:19 PM Thread Starter
 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Green Bay
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Interesting.
I wish I could open up that brain of yours Dave and have it turned into a book of knowledge lol.
So I will have to source 69-70 hubs or will I be able to use 68 and previous? Or any later common spindle fit? Something more common maybe?

1969 Caprice 327 TH350 - restomod project
2003 Impala 9c1 - stuff done
1964 Chevelle Malibu SS - mild resto
1976 XJ12 - stock v12/bagged
1998 Trans Am - lots done
1999 GTP - lots done
1999 GSE - T66 T3/T04e hybrid
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 05-14-2014, 08:16 PM
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You have discovered the problem. Only a three year spread, makes any disc brake parts you find rare as hen's teeth and expensive. You have to settle for A or G-body (Chevelle or Monte Carlo) brake parts from 1968-'72 and use adapters to bolt them on (which is what all of the brake kits do), or go with custom made spindles, calipers and rotors from Wilwood or Baer (which limits going to your corner store for brake parts).

I would also like to add that disc brakes are great for racing, but do not work as well on the street as drum brakes do. The only reason GM switched over to disc brakes is they cost one third as much to make and install on new cars. Drum brakes only have one weakness. The drum can only soak up so much heat because it is mass (a big slug of cast iron) that keeps disc brakes working in a race when a drum brake would have faded away.

More expensive cars that use the same size interchangeable parts such as Buick or Pontiac had aluminum fined cast iron sleeved brake drums to shed heat faster. (Be careful of Pontiac high performance brake parts as they also had their own cast eight lug aluminum wheel that bolted to the finned drum).

Here is a more modern example off of the rear of a Monte Carlo SS

http://www.gbodyparts.com/popup_imag...3f6183db78e39e

Here is the mid sixties finned aluminum Buick drum:

http://image.automotive.com/f/tech/1...les+walden.jpg

and some one with way too much time on their hands polished this one.

http://www.motortopia.com/worldofrod...010/06/152.jpg

Big Dave
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