1959 Bel-Air destroyed - Impala Tech
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-19-2009, 01:15 AM Thread Starter
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1959 Bel-Air destroyed

Did any on see this that really sucks. Destroyed perfect 1959 Bel Air.
http://autos.aol.com/article/crash-1959-chevy

Make: Chevrolet
Model: Impala
Year: 1971
Doors: 4
Motor: 400 V8
Tranny: TH350
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-19-2009, 11:58 AM
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Saw that a couple weeks ago. Too bad for the bel air, was a nice car

1966 Caprice
1968 Impala (Frame Off Project)
2001 Tahoe LT
1972 Chevy C10
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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-19-2009, 06:40 PM
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Yeah, watch it close. There's a lot of rust colored dust at impact, leading experts and novices like myself to believe the car was not in the best shape under the paint. Also, there's a lot of speculation as to whether the engine/drive train was intact or not. The lack of all that metal might had some effect on the outcome, who knows?

I think it was a bigger waste of time to do this with a not complete/solid car then to waste the car to begin with. This just adds fuel to the fire of those who want the old cars gone.

Rant over. we now return you to your regularly scheduled thread.

Vance

Watch for updates starting soon in my blog here ~ http://www.impalas.net/forums/blog.php?u=1588
And on my own website ~ http://www.violentlee.com/biscayne.html
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-19-2009, 07:53 PM
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Hmmmm, I can't imagine why a rotted out, incomplete car wouldn't do as well in a crash as a complete new car.

This is along the lines of the Chevy truck scam they pulled years ago, where they blew up the gas tank upon impact with another car.

Don't listen to me, what do I know? I've only been doing this for 30 years.
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-19-2009, 08:35 PM
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Yeah, and the actual flame started before the impact and that was on tape too.

Watch for updates starting soon in my blog here ~ http://www.impalas.net/forums/blog.php?u=1588
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-19-2009, 11:30 PM Thread Starter
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violentlee you are right that car was very rusted weak frame possibly no motor. If you look at the second and third frame in the vid you will see what he is talking about. Looks like no motor no front core support that would explain the impact so severe on the 59. And all that rust dust in the air.

Make: Chevrolet
Model: Impala
Year: 1971
Doors: 4
Motor: 400 V8
Tranny: TH350
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-20-2009, 11:29 AM
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I saw this on another forum and wondered why they didn't use a new Impala for better comparison instead of a Malibu.

I think the biggest point made with this is driver safety. Whether the 59 had an engine or not wouldn't have any further affect on the injuries the driver would sustain. Watch how the steering column ends up right in the drivers face and chest and the head/neck impact following. Look at how the cabin and structure of the A piller caves into the driver compartment. Then watch the newer car. We have come a long way on terms of driver safety.

Us guys driving older cars also have to remember to keep a good distance to a newer car in front of you since we don't have anti-lock brakes. I had an incident the other day like this and my front tires locked up. The guy in front of me was able to stop on a dime. I'm so used to driving a car with anti-locks it was scary how the car almost felt like it sped up once that happened.
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-20-2009, 11:34 AM
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Now that I watched that video posted I realized it wasn't the same video I was talking about.

This one shows the impact on the drivers. And yes there is an engine in the 59. You can see the exhaust leading to it on the side shot.

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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-20-2009, 01:53 PM
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Well there is an exhaust pipe there. Once the rust dust starts rolling in, it's hard to say where the pipe goes. On the right side shot you can see what looks like exhaust flange gaskets rolling about. Would the exhaust pipe bolts snapped that quickly and easily to allow those gaskets to fly so easily?

I had a relative die in a frontal wreck not too different from this while driving a '68 Impala. Whit the engine in place in his car, (he was driving it at the time) the left side exhaust manifold was placed squarely next to him after the dust cleared.

Now don't get me wrong. I'm a big proponent of all the safety devices you can load into a car. I caught nine kinds of grief from the purists when I put a disc brake kit on my open wheeled '34 Ford. I'm sorry; I just don't like to have to aim for soft stuff while planting the brake pedal to the floor. My daily is a 2000 Trooper with A-L brakes and airbags. I'm glad there're there but I NEVER rely on them. I learned to drive in the era before A'L brakes and drive every car like that. I'm also the world's biggest proponent of 'safe assured distance' - that's what the law calls it here in Ohio. It states one of your own vehicle length/10 mph. It's easily my biggest pet peeve on the hwy; that and slower traffic keep right.

My Biscayne will get 4 wheel disc too. Maybe a roll bar with harness style belts; and I'll use them. Once again, I won't give a sh*t what who thinks. But the most important thing that will be added to the car is a knowledgeable, insightful, well-informed, trained driver who will be paying attention.

Currently, I have State Farm insurance and they treat me GREAT. My premiums are so low I can't stand it. They say it's because people with cars like mine tend to drive WAY more defensively and go out of the way to avoid wrecks and I can say that describes me pretty good.

Ok. Seriously. I'm done now. I just hate when we see things that are skewed to twist the facts and opinions of the less intelligent in society for a pre-determined agenda. Kinda like political ads.

Carry on.
Vance

Watch for updates starting soon in my blog here ~ http://www.impalas.net/forums/blog.php?u=1588
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-21-2009, 01:35 PM
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I too watched this - and frankly, I think it's bunk! Supposedly each car was travelling around 17 - 20 mph ? That Chevy had to be made out of aluminum foil to disintegrate like that! Not to deride the much better safety of today's cars (including the incredible telescoping steering shaft!) - but c'mon, people.

I had a '62 Chrysler that smacked into a brick wall at 30 mph and it didn't even budge the bumper. The house, of course was a wreck! I for one don't beleive for a second that that '59 Chevy was truly representative as a member of our old cars.

And what a shame to waste those perfectly good fenders and hood! Sheesh!

'63 Impala Sedan
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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-21-2009, 10:58 PM
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I agree with Vance. I'm all for safe cars. I also think this is BULL. I was a teenager driving a '64 Chevelle and got in a very similar accident with a new Sunbird. It felt like I hit a pot hole. I looked up to see the Sunbird air born and flying across someones lawn before it came to rest against a fence. The car was totaled. The Sunbird, not mine. I needed a bumper, a left front fender and a new set of headlights. It did tweak the frame a quarter inch, but the new metal bolted up with out an issue and it still tracked straight.

I was traveling about 15 miles per hour and the Sunbird was going 45. (speeding for the road she was on)

I have a hard time believing this staged "accident" is anything but a hoax to influence people negatively against our wonderful hobby.

Don't listen to me, what do I know? I've only been doing this for 30 years.
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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-22-2009, 02:57 PM Thread Starter
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If some of you people here have seen the movie Mad Max remember the 59 Impala when the bikers chased it and it flipped it was not that much damage.

Make: Chevrolet
Model: Impala
Year: 1971
Doors: 4
Motor: 400 V8
Tranny: TH350
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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old 10-22-2009, 03:50 PM
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I think some of the replies and comparions here are funny. Among the skepticism and cynicism, I have a harder time believing the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety "has it in" for our beloved old car hobby.

I've already voiced my opinion so I'll just present some facts here. The crash was done with the cars doing 35 mph, which gives you a closing speed of 70 mph with both vehicles weighing approx. 3,600 lbs. Hitting a brick wall at 30 mph is no comparison. The brick wall broke apart and dissipated the energy. That's the fundamental engineering behind how crash crumple zones work in modern cars and how dissipating energy can reduce injuries. That's how helmets have progressed. That's how roll cages work in race cars. That's how carbon/kevlar components function in F1 and Indy cars.

Bottom line is we are riding in much safer vehicles today. There are many safety components on a car that most of us don't know are even there and take for granted until they're needed. How many members here add tons of horsepower to their old Chevy but then don't replace the single chamber, "suicide" master cylinder? Easy to overlook until it's too late. Just like seat belts...

BTW, The '59 did have an engine:
http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2009...ir-crash-test/

Consumer Reports follow up:
http://blogs.consumerreports.org/car...ctors-cut.html
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post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old 11-26-2009, 09:13 AM
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Someone should build some bolt in crumple zones for old cars! A crumple zone and airbag retro fit kit for Impalas.

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