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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-05-2018, 02:18 PM Thread Starter
 
 
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Key Sets

My 63 did not come with any keys when I bought it, so I was looking at buying a complete set from Classic Industries. It lists long cylinder and short cylinder, what does that mean and how do I know which one I have?

Thanks!
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-05-2018, 02:24 PM
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By taking your locks apart and examining them to count the number of tumblers that you see sticking up.

Personally I would just buy a new set of locks with keys and install them in place of what you have now. I personally have all of my Chevy vehicles that do not have an electronic chip in them keyed alike so I need only have one key to move my fleet of junk cars around the yard come time to mow.

Big Dave
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-05-2018, 07:46 PM
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Take out your cylinders, they have numbers on them, get new keys made. No need to replace your parts.

Two doors, four doors, wagons, and ragtops.
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-05-2018, 08:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayoldschool View Post
Take out your cylinders, they have numbers on them, get new keys made. No need to replace your parts.
A true statement but all parts wear. Locks and keys are made of brass which is a soft metal that wears quickly if used a lot. To me labor is worth nearly a third the price of the part to two thirds the price of the part. So it actually is cheaper to replace the part once you have it out.

Big Dave
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-08-2018, 07:51 PM Thread Starter
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Dave View Post
By taking your locks apart and examining them to count the number of tumblers that you see sticking up.

Personally I would just buy a new set of locks with keys and install them in place of what you have now. I personally have all of my Chevy vehicles that do not have an electronic chip in them keyed alike so I need only have one key to move my fleet of junk cars around the yard come time to mow.

Big Dave
How do I tell them apart once they are out? I wont have another set to compare them too.
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-08-2018, 10:31 PM
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Two door locks are the same, but differs from the trunk lock (the glove box also uses a door/trunk lock key but I never locked mine). Ignition lock is different from door and trunk and has (from memory) two extra tumblers making it longer.

If you do not have a book telling you how to take things apart and put it back together again (R&R) then take lots of pictures, and send yourself a couple of voice mails with descriptions of procedure.

Big Dave
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-15-2018, 11:36 PM
 
 
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Key Sets

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Dave View Post
By taking your locks apart and examining them to count the number of tumblers that you see sticking up.

Personally I would just buy a new set of locks with keys and install them in place of what you have now. I personally have all of my Chevy vehicles that do not have an electronic chip in them keyed alike so I need only have one key to move my fleet of junk cars around the yard come time to mow.

Big Dave

Should the same key that unlocks the trunk also unlock the doors of a 1964 Impala 2-door hardtop? I can't get my doors to unlock, but trunk opens fine. What's the best way to gain entry and replace locks if necessary?


BobbyDS
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-16-2018, 10:16 AM
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Police cars used one key to open everything, all locks keyed alike. The rest of GM's fleet used one octagonal key for the ignition (then went to a rectangular shape), and a second oval key to unlock everything else.

In the sixties there where a limited number of tumblers so there were a limited number of keys. Car thieves would get one for each combination and try them on your car to gain access (So a cop who found a crock with a wad of keys in his pocket knew he was a car thief). Most lock smiths (if they are old enough) have a wad of Master keys for a GM car of your vintage and can get in using one. If not they will have to use a "Burglar Bar" to grab the rod that connects the lock to the latch to gain access (usually faster than using a key).

https://jmcautomotiveequipment.com/a...SABEgKV2vD_BwE

Big Dave
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