1962 Impala 2 Door 283 V8 - Impala Tech
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-12-2018, 10:31 PM Thread Starter
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1962 Impala 2 Door 283 V8

Monday I will have a 62 Impala. My goal is a comfortable cool cruiser that is able to drive 300 miles (Orlando to Naples) without issues.

I'll post up pictures Monday, but was curious if the budget was 3000 to build it as safe and reliable, how would you guys do it?

Of course I'd love front disk brake conversion, new carb, intake, headers and working AC...
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-13-2018, 11:12 AM
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Welcome to the Team!

Unless you routinely exceed 70 mph you do not need disc brakes. Your brakes where designed to meet the needs of a 45 mph national speed limit. It isn't as bad as it sounds because back when this car was designed on paper with a slide rule it was standard practice to build in a 50% safety margin so that 45 is actually designed to safely stop the car from 67.5 mph. Adding disc brakes adds other problems.

The car was designed to offer no road response what so ever. It has marshmallow tough suspension and steering, so the car will practically roll over on tight high "G" turns and it will tend to follow the depressions in the road pounded in by heavy trucks.

This assumes the wheels are not falling off from excessive wear and lack of routine maintenance. Which leads me to the first thing I would do which is to replace all wear items on the front end (ball joints, tie rod ends, idler arm, wheel bearings, and brakes).

Your car has a single master cylinder that operates in the 1,000 to 1,200 psi range. It has old rotted hoses on the end of the rusty mild steel brake lines. If you go to disc brakes the operating line pressure jumps to 2,500 to 3,000 psi, which will overwhelm the rear drum system so it will require a proportioning valve to be added to the system. You will also need a power assist dual reservoir master cylinder that has to match the pedal and rod in your brake linkage (there are a total of five choices of master cylinder bore and piston style to choose from; with a wrong choice resulting in brakes that don't work.)

Further if the car has power steering now it is unlike anything you have seen before. It utilizes a hydraulic ram attached to the center link and the frame of the car. It has a special steering gear box that senses your input and opens the hydraulics to push the ram in the correct direction. Leaks not only result in poor steering it can cause a complete loss of control of the car. The Corvette from 1963 through 1982 uses the same steering parts and offer service parts that are hard to find for your year Impala. It is difficult to change over to the more common integrated Saginaw steering gear box used on all GM vehicles made from 1965 through 1999. Adapting newer gear boxes causes issues with steering geometry that affects your turning radius and tire wear.

Finally the little things such as wiper blades, fuses and light bulbs all have to be checked and repaired or replaced.

Big Dave
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-13-2018, 01:28 PM
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Check/refurb/maintain all stock systems. Fuel/brakes/suspension/steering/cooling/driveline/ignition/tires/etc. Hoses, lines, belts, bushings, etc, etc. Get everything sorted. The car will make the drive without issues if everything is working correctly. This will take most of your budget. Swap on a dual master cylinder like Dave says. I did one on my 65 C10, still on the stock master on my 65 Impala.

Two doors, four doors, wagons, and ragtops.
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-13-2018, 05:04 PM
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Dave and Jay know what to do.

To achieve your specific goals, most of that stock stuff is perfectly fine, although I'd get rid of the points and go with an HEI ignition and 1-wire alternator for more driveability and reliability.

Either flush the cooling system, or step up and just get a new radiator. No telling how long yours will last or what shape is in internally.
Naturally, changing oil, plugs, tranny fluid, rear-end fluid, wipers (for those afternoon rain showers Florida is famous for) and some new brake pads/cylinders and all new brake fluid and you should be good to go! If your engine fan is a 4-blade and has no shroud, you might think about some updates there for those hot Florida summer days.

Oh, and a good set of tires and radio/speakers for some road tunes!

Good luck!

HOW A NOVICE REBUILDS A 66 IMPALA CONVERTIBLE:
http://www.impalas.net/forums/blog.php?u=1432
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-13-2018, 06:15 PM Thread Starter
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-15-2018, 07:28 AM
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Looks like you have already been converted to a dual master cylinder power break system. Did they go to front disc brakes already?

With that being said the first thing you need to do is figure out what other repairs/upgrades have been done to the car and was the work done properly. That tends to be the biggest problem with cars as old as these, other people have most likely worked on them at some point. Even cars that have had frame off restorations can have shoddy work done in the process. I'm kinda lucky in the 1963 I'm getting. My grandfather was the original owners mechanic for the 15 years they owned it and then my dad bought it. Now it is being given to me.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-16-2018, 09:15 AM Thread Starter
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Where do I locate the serial numbers on the frame and engine so I could see what the build sheet says it's supposed to have
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-16-2018, 11:26 AM
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The VIN is on the inside the driver's door jamb. The engine number is on the block, passenger side, where the head meets the block. This will be the engine plant and date. Casting number of the block on the back side by the transmission, driver's side. The cowl tag is on the firewall by the wiper motor.

Headers --> don't bother, IMO. Either keep the 2" ram horn manifolds or get a set of 2½" ram horn manifolds. Less hassle and maintenance.

Disc brakes --> It looks like you already have a set installed. Look under the car to verify.

Good luck!!

1967 Chevrolet Impala SS convertible - Ermine White C1
1967 Chevrolet Impala SS 396 - Marina Blue FF
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-16-2018, 01:32 PM Thread Starter
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On a side note once we got it off the trailer at the house I poured a little gas in the carburetor put a new battery in and it started right up. I just have to fix the fuel leak in the rubber line from the fuel filter.
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-16-2018, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkoverlift View Post
On a side note once we got it off the trailer at the house I poured a little gas in the carburetor put a new battery in and it started right up. I just have to fix the fuel leak in the rubber line from the fuel filter.
This car was built before Gasohol was introduced. All of the rubber fuel lines need to be replaced with TFE plastic lined fuel hose to prevent the alcohol from attacking the rubber part of the hose.

Cheap Chinese imported stainless steel lines (just about everything in the market) are just rubber on the inside and do not withstand alcohol or high pressure. For this reason they should not be used for fuel or power steering lines.

The stainless steel cover was used in aviation applications to prevent abrasion of the hoses as they were routed through out the plane or helicopter. It was the number of scrapped surplus Viet Nam era helicopters in southern California is the reason racers started using surplus stainless steel braided hose rather than buying brand new hose from NAPA, because it was cheaper not because it was better.

Big Dave
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post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-17-2018, 05:40 PM Thread Starter
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post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-17-2018, 05:41 PM Thread Starter
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Photos uploaded under the username darkoverlift. those are the only serial numbers I could find
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