combo-resto project... - Impala Tech
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-25-2014, 05:35 PM Thread Starter
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Washougal
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combo-resto project...

So I'm all for originality, but there are just somethings about that car, 68 impala, that wasn't very, um... technically road friendly it didn't handle AT ALL, and did great at lots of 1 tire fire shootouts in closed spaces and in hot traffic...

So I'm going to try to find a rolling chassis with the LEAST amount of rust, and go from there. 1968 4 door Chevrolet Impala 8 cylinder, needs to be a 327, so that's where I'm headed. Probably going to go with a t56 viper style transmission, maybe 9:1 compression, but keep it classy, really good IRON heads, to reduce headgasket shearing forces, go to aluminum heads later. But get the good rear end, Chevy proper, none of this 9 inch mess, and cheat all the way on axles, bearings, drifeshafts, seals, bushings, fluids and rear end styles... Think cruise at 120 at 2500 revs, knowing the CAR can take 150 or more, but can YOU

Please don't ask about my budget, it's my business, and I've been around long enough to know the game and how it works.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-13-2014, 12:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noxneon View Post
Please don't ask about my budget, it's my business, and I've been around long enough to know the game and how it works.
There's a disclaimer I haven't seen before.
Since you didn't ask any questions, I'll bet you will be safe from anyone daring asking about your budget.

-Nick

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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-13-2014, 10:05 AM
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Been to Washougal as I was raised in the Okanogan - nice place. Got my 64 out of Spokane and had it shipped to LA. Best of luck finding your donor.


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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-13-2014, 10:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noxneon View Post
So I'm all for originality, but there are just somethings about that car, 68 impala, that wasn't very, um... technically road friendly it didn't handle AT ALL, and did great at lots of 1 tire fire shootouts in closed spaces and in hot traffic...

So I'm going to try to find a rolling chassis with the LEAST amount of rust, and go from there. 1968 4 door Chevrolet Impala 8 cylinder, needs to be a 327, so that's where I'm headed. Probably going to go with a t56 viper style transmission, maybe 9:1 compression, but keep it classy, really good IRON heads, to reduce headgasket shearing forces, go to aluminum heads later. But get the good rear end, Chevy proper, none of this 9 inch mess, and cheat all the way on axles, bearings, drifeshafts, seals, bushings, fluids and rear end styles...

Please don't ask about my budget, it's my business, and I've been around long enough to know the game and how it works.
Welcome to the Team Jordan!

Let me address some of your statements: with a 27 inch tall tire (street tire) and a 2.73 rear gear you can cruise at 118-121 mph at 2500 RPM assuming you can generate enough horsepower to obtain that speed. To hit 150 mph with a 1968 four door Impala that weights 3,623 pounds (shipping weighty new) you would need 1,606.44 horsepower to over come the 1,587.60 horsepower resistance due to air drag and a rolling resistance is 18.84 horsepower to friction assuming you use rock hard tires. That is asking an awful lot out of a 9.0:1 compression ratio 327. The horse power requirements climb exponentially as speed increases.

You can go to Wallace Racing dot com to use his many calculators there for free. Or if you are a mechanical engineer with a HP 41c calculator that has all four ports filled with preprogramed software modules you c n calculate all of this from physics formulas.

Big Dave
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-13-2014, 11:54 AM
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I think that calculator is way off. I have hit 147mph in my cutlass while it had 2.56 gears and 350 with way less power than I have right now.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-13-2014, 03:26 PM
BA.
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........is that measured by the stock (incredibly inaccurate as speed increases) speedometer?

HOW A NOVICE REBUILDS A 66 IMPALA CONVERTIBLE:
http://www.impalas.net/forums/blog.php?u=1432
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-13-2014, 03:28 PM
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Air resistance is the biggest factor (accounts for more than eighty five percent of the needed energy). Newton's F=ma applies but the rate of acceleration will be dismal due to the lack of power and the rear gear needed to reach his desired cruise RPM with objective speed. It is the add ons that kills the ease of computing because there are so many factors that have to be considered. One other aerodynamic issue that I have not mentioned is the fact that sixty era cars have a bad habit of going air borne around 130 mph because the air takes less time to go under the car than around it. This created lift and with all of that power pushing the brick shaped car through the air it doesn't take but a bump for it to lift off.

If you doubt this ;check out early NASCR race YouTubes where the speed was 120 to 130 mph and you can see Pontiac Catalinas and Chevy Impalas flipping end over end as the front end lifts off the smooth track. Ford Galaxies and Chrysler 300's were not inune either and they got some air time as well.

Modern NASCAR bodies have trap doors that spill air if the car starts to go airborn as well as having full belly pans, and spoilers, and air dams and cutters that force the air up rather than under the car.

Big Dave
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-14-2014, 08:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BA. View Post
........is that measured by the stock (incredibly inaccurate as speed increases) speedometer?
No, it was measured by California highway patrol. Thank god the kind officer is a big fan of muscle cars.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-14-2014, 08:15 AM
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NASCAR cars weighed half of the weight of a stock full interior car. It will take a lot more than going 130mph to flip 4000 pound car.
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